Tag Archives: AP Biology

Mitosis Quiz from sciencemusicvideos

Mitosis Quiz: Key Concepts. A quiz from sciencemusicvideos

This quiz tests you about the significance of cell division. Among other things, it tests you on this diagram. Let your cursor hover over it to see a key.

majorEventsInMitosis

Major events in cell division

[qwiz random = “true” qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-mitosisKeyConcepts”]

[h] Quiz: key mitosis concepts

[i] Here’s how these quizzes work:

  • Each question is multiple choice, but the entire quiz is like a series of flashcards.
  • If you get the question right, it comes off the deck.
  • If you get the question wrong, it goes to the bottom of the deck, so you can try it again.

[!]QUESTION 1+++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] 1. Which of the following is NOT a function that cell division plays in multicellular organisms?

[c] repairing damaged tissues

[c] providing additional cells for growth

[c*] sending signals throughout your body.

[f] No. Note that this question is asking you ‘which is NOT a function of cell division.’ The way that your body repairs damaged tissues is by replacing the damaged cells, and that happens through cell division. Next time you see this question, try to identify a function that’s NOT connected to cell division.

[f] No. Note that this question is asking you ‘which is NOT a function of cell division.’ The primary way that you grew from being a single celled zygote (fertilized egg) to the person with trillions of cells that you are now was through adding additional cells, and that happens through cell division. Next time you see this question, try to identify a function that’s NOT connected to cell division.

[f] Yes! Signaling happens either through waves of ions flowing along nerve cell membranes, or through release of hormones into the bloodstream. In other words, cell division doesn’t play any direct role in these processes.

[!]QUESTION 2+++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] 2. Which of the following diseases is most directly related to abnormal cell division?

[c*] cancer

[c] cystic fibrosis

[c] Heart attack

[c] Diabetes

[f] Exactly. Cancer is a disease of abnormal cell division.

[f] No. Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease caused by the malfunction of a chlorine ion transporter in the cell membranes of  cells in your lungs and other organs. Next time, choose a disease that is directly related to cell division.

[f] No. Heart attacks are caused by blocked arteries in the heart, which cause the cells downstream of the blockage to become damaged (or even die). Next time, choose a disease that is directly related to cell division.

[f] No. Diabetes is a metabolic disease involving the body’s inability to control blood sugar levels. Next time, choose a disease that is directly related to cell division.

[!]QUESTION 3+++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] 3. Genetically, what’s the relationship between the daughter cells that result from cell division, and the parent cell?

[c] The relationship is exactly like the relationship between the mother and a daughter in a human family.

[c*] The daughter cells from mitosis and cell division are exact duplicates, or clones of each other, and of the parent cell.

[c] The daughter cells are identical to each other, but only half-way related to the mother (just like identical twins in a human family).

[f] No. In a human family, a daughter receives half of her DNA from her mother, and half from her father. In mitosis and cell division, the daughter cells receive all of their DNA from the parent cell. In fact, the parent cell, after cell division, no longer exists. It has become the daughter cell, each of which is half new, and half old.

[f] That’s exactly right. Each daughter cell is identical to the other daughter cell, and to the parent cell.  In fact, the parent cell, after cell division, no longer exists. It has become the daughter cells, each of which is half new, and half old.

[f] No. Unlike human identical twins, the cells that result from mitosis and cell division are not only exact genetic copies of one another. They’re also exact copies of the parent cell (who no longer really exists, having become the two daughter cells).

[!]QUESTION 4+++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] 4. In the diagram below (showing the major events in cell division), which number is showing the separation of sister chromatids?

[c] 1

[c] 2

[c*] 3

[c] 4

[f] No. In this first step, single chromosomes are becoming doubled chromosomes, each consisting of two sister chromatids. Next time, look for a step where these sister chromatids are being separated into single chromosomes

[f] No. After step 1, the chromosomes are doubled, consisting of two sister chromatids. In step 2, the spindle apparatus is being constructed. Next time, look for a step where these sister chromatids are being separated into single chromosomes.

[f] Awesome! After step 1, the chromosomes are doubled, consisting of two sister chromatids. In step 2, the spindle apparatus is being constructed. In step 3, the sister chromatids are being pulled apart.

[f] No. By step four, the sister chromatids have already been pulled apart into single chromosomes, and the cell is splitting in half, a process called cytokinesis. Next time, look for a step where doubled chromosomes (also known as sister chromatids) are being separated into single chromosomes.

[!]QUESTION 5+++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]5. In the diagram below (showing the major events in cell division), which number is showing chromosome duplication?

[c*] 1

[c] 2

[c] 3

[c] 4

[f] Exactly. In step 1, single chromosomes are being duplicated, becoming doubled chromosomes consisting of two sister chromatids.

[f] No. In step 2, the spindle apparatus is being constructed. The chromosomes are already doubled, and have a characteristic ‘X’ shaped form. Next time, look for a step where single chromosomes (which don’t look like an ‘X,’ are being doubled so that they do look like an ‘X.’

[f] No. In step 3, the sister chromatids are being pulled apart. Next time, look for a step where single chromosomes (which don’t look like an ‘X,’ are being doubled so that they do look like an ‘X.’

[f] No. In step 4,  the cell is splitting in half, a process called cytokinesis. Next time, look for a step where single chromosomes (which don’t look like an ‘X,’ are being doubled so that they do look like an ‘X.’

[!]QUESTION 6+++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]6. In the diagram below (showing the major events in cell division), which number is showing cytokinesis?

[c] 1

[c] 2

[c] 3

[c*] 4

[f] No. In step 1, single chromosomes are being duplicated, becoming doubled chromosomes consisting of two sister chromatids. Next time, look for a step that shows one cell becoming two cells.

[f] No. In step 2, the spindle apparatus is being constructed. Next time, look for a step that shows one cell becoming two cells.

[f] No. In step 3, the sister chromatids are being pulled apart. Next time, look for a step that shows one cell becoming two cells.

[f] Perfect! In step 4,  the cell is splitting in half, a process called cytokinesis.

[!]QUESTION 7+++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]7. In the diagram below (showing the major events in cell division), which number is showing the creation of the spindle apparatus, which is the mechanism for pulling doubled chromosomes (also known as sister chromatids) apart?

[c] 1

[c*] 2

[c] 3

[c] 4

[f] No. In step 1, single chromosomes are being duplicated, becoming doubled chromosomes consisting of two sister chromatids. Next time, look for a step that shows the appearance of an array of fibers in the cell. These fibers make up the spindle apparatus, and their function is to pull apart the sister chromatids.

[f] Terrific! In step 2, the spindle apparatus is being constructed.

[f] No. In step 3, the sister chromatids are being pulled apart. Next time, look for a step that shows the appearance of an array of fibers in the cell. These fibers make up the spindle apparatus, and their function is to pull apart the sister chromatids.

[f] No. In step 4,  the cell is splitting in half, a process called cytokinesis. Next time, look for a step that shows the appearance of an array of fibers in the cell. These fibers make up the spindle apparatus, and their function is to pull apart the sister chromatids.

[!]QUESTION 8+++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]8. In the diagram below (showing the major events in cell division), which number shows replication of DNA?

[c*] 1

[c] 2

[c] 3

[c] 4

[f] Nice! In step 1, single chromosomes are being duplicated, becoming doubled chromosomes consisting of two sister chromatids. Doubling of chromosomes comes about through replication of DNA.

[f] No. In step 2, the spindle apparatus is being constructed. DNA replication occurs as single chromosomes (which don’t look like an ‘X’) become doubled chromosomes (which do look like an ‘X’). Next time, find a step where this change in chromosome appearance occurs.

[f] No. In step 3, the sister chromatids are being pulled apart. DNA replication occurs as single chromosomes (which don’t look like an ‘X’) become doubled chromosomes (which do look like an ‘X’). Next time, find a step where this change in chromosome appearance occurs.

[f] No. In step 4,  the cell is splitting in half, a process called cytokinesis. DNA replication occurs as single chromosomes (which don’t look like an ‘X’) become doubled chromosomes (which do look like an ‘X’). Next time, find a step where this change in chromosome appearance occurs.

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